5 Lazy Ways To Make Your Jazz Solo Sound 10x Better (In 8 minutes)

Imagine if there were 5 short licks that you can already play that would make your solos sound 10x better!

If you are trying to sound more like Jazz when you solo then you have probably run into this problem:

You can play an arpeggio:

and you can play a scale:

and you can put it together to a lick that fits the chords but…

It doesn’t sound right, even though the notes are all “perfect” and “correct”, Now what? Let me show you!

#1 Make Your Arpeggios Swing!

This is about rhythm even with examples like this that are all 8th notes. And you need the right melody to get the right rhythm. It also turns out that another major part of it is surprisingly enough technique.

other cam:

I have to admit that I wish my teachers had given me stuff like this when I was starting, that could have made phrasing so much easier.

back:

The first lick I want you to use is the first half of the bar, which is just an Em7 arpeggio:

Lazy Lick #1

You can play any arpeggio like this, and it will always sound great! Here’s a G7 arpeggio with a resolution:

Or maybe a C6 arpeggio, it doesn’t really matter:

It’s just a way to play an arpeggio, it’s lazy and doesn’t take a lot of work. Notice that you use legato-technique, the pull-off, and this exact melody to get an accent on the 2nd note of the arpeggio which makes it pop and sound a lot better.

And that is part of getting your solos to sound like Jazz: You want to have high notes on offbeats that get an accent. In the beginning when you are just learning arpeggios and soloing then you end up sounding like this:

You can tell how that is kinda heavy, but adding this way of playing arpeggios to your solos can lighten that up.

Let’s use that on a complete II V I just to hear it in action. I am using it in two places but the last one is making a variation of the rhythm as well.

For me, a few clear examples like this and some guidance on how to phrase them plus maybe some Grant Green solos as homework could have done a LOT for my phrasing early on, but don’t get me wrong I am very grateful to my teachers for all the stuff I learned, but this one thing, that wasn’t really there….

Let’s go to another similar trick that is even easier to play!

#2 Make Your Arpeggios Swing More!

So it is about having that high-note on an off-beat which you then can give an accent. Here’s the 2nd lazy way to do that, it is super simple! I’m using an Fmaj7 arpeggio:

Lazy Lick #2

I am playing this one with legato as well, but you don’t have to. In a way, it is funny that this is about using that a pull-off is naturally softer than a picked note(play the pull off) so we pick the note on the offbeat and the technique makes the following note softer which makes the phrasing better.

For me, that is the opposite of what I try to achieve with legato playing , since I try to get everything as even as possible.

This lick is easy to use and gives your lines a nice natural flow, I am using the Fmaj7 over a Dm7 chord, so the arpeggio from the 3rd:

Let me explain the arpeggio from the 3rd with this chart, it is incredibly useful:

Notice that I am using a pull-off to give the chromatic note on the G7 an accent. This arpeggio building block is also great for moving from one chord to the next which makes it very easy to use in a lot of songs. Check out how the Bø arpeggio resolves to Cmaj7 in the next example and how I am using the Am7 arpeggio on the Dm7 chord to add dynamics in that bar:

Let me know how you feel about this, for me, just being aware of this already started to fix a lot of heavy phrasing in my playing, and made me able to hear it much more clearly when I am listening to solos which is maybe just as important! Lazy learning is just always a bonus! Let’s explore some triad tricks!

#3 Triads + Secret Ingredient

Start with a basic triad like this Dm triad:

Now let’s make that sound about 100x more like a Jazz lick:

And if you play that then this next part almost naturally falls out of your hands!

And here you have the same phrase sounding great with the C major triad on the Cmaj7 chord

The next phrase is really simple but also very effective!

#4 Scale and A Half-step

Lazy solutions are nice! We’re just trying to create a short phrase with a high note on ether 1& or 2&, so why not just use a scale melody? Maybe with a leading note just to spice it up a bit!

The accent is easy enough, and you can of course move this around to other chords, but maybe the Bø is a bit awkward:

It is pretty easy to make a line with this, I’m adding a triplet on the G7 just for a bit of variation as well:

And check out how this next one uses the F and C versions of this scale phrase (play) plus some of the previous 7th chord arpeggio tricks

First the Scale phrase from F, then the ascending Fmaj7 arpeggio which gives you the accent on 4& but also leads to the G7 phrase which is now starting on the 5th. On the resolution to Cmaj7 you have the scale phrase from C with added A to just round it off in a nice way.

Let’s take a look at an easy way to play “the most Bebop sounding arpeggio” which, of course, also has a nice phrasing accent in there!

#5 The Easy Pivot Arpeggio

You might know this from other videos that I have made, this melody:

is an Fmaj7 pivot arpeggio. It is a Bebop Superpower! The term pivot arpeggio is something that I learned from Barry Harris.

It doesn’t immediately look like an Fmaj7 arpeggio which would be:

But the concept is that you play the first note, the F and then you move the rest of the arpeggio down an octave which gives you:

And if you follow the counterpoint rules then after the ascending arpeggio part you want to continue with a descending stepwise motion, so in this case from E down to D. Which gives you that high note on 2& and an accent and it is also just a beautiful melody and great example of octave displacement:

Barry taught this exercise by playing both the normal arpeggio with that resolution and then the pivot through the scale:

But to keep it easy, or lazy, then just focus on the maj7 arpeggio which is both the one that is used the most and which is pretty easy to play if you do it like this on two strings. And this gives you some of the most melodic bebop lines:

But as you know then there are two maj7 chords in C major: Fmaj7 and Cmaj7 so you can also use the Cmaj7 pivot arpeggio on that chord. That could give you this much more syncopated example:

Study Barry Harris to Learn Bebop!

As you can tell, Barry Harris is a great place to level up your Bebop and not only learn scales and arpeggios but also learn how to turn that into beautiful vocabulary that you can use in your solos. One of the most powerful things that he teaches which has really transformed my playing and is also another shortcut for better phrasing is how he adds chromatic passing notes to phrases. I talk about that in this video and it is easily 100x better than Bebop scales, which I anyway really don’t like, I explain why in the video, check it out. Learn Jazz Make Music!

Why Barry Harris’ Approach Is So Much Better Than Bebop Scales!

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