Category Archives: News

Updates from Jens Larsen – Jazz guitarist

7 Minor Scales You Need To Know About

Having different Minor Scale will help you not always sounding the same in your solos. It is important to have a solid vocabulary to chose a minor scale from. The minor scale guitar solos in this video demonstrate 7 different sounds and I also talk about what the notes are and how I improvise with the scale.

Hope you like it!

Content

0:00 Intro

0:46 Melodic Minor Solo

1:05 Scale break down and improvisation suggestions

2:59 Harmonic Minor Solo

3:21 Scale break down – It’s a sound not just a set of notes!

5:32 Dorian Solo

5:56 Scale Discussion – Modes are not really tonal

8:23 Natural Minor/Aeolian Solo

8:46 The Scale and the Folk Sound

10:31 The Blues Scale

10:51 A scale sound on top of a minor chord?

11:58 Dorian #4

12:23 Scale break down – A harmonic minor sound and a triad pair

14:35 The Augemented Scale

14:55 A scale that doesn’t really fit but it still does…

17:52 Did I forget a scale?

18:25 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page

3 Music Theory Mistakes You Want To Avoid (Jazz Rant)

Besides my rant on how people get things wrong with Music Theory this video is also on some of the things that you are missing if you don’t use music theory right or forget to check out important parts. When you study Jazz or Jazz Guitar then music theory is a part of what you need and what you want to learn, but you want to go about it the right way.

Most of the things I talk about in here are mistakes or problems that you run into if your approach to music theory is very superficial. Hopefully I also manage to give some pointers to a better approach to learn and use music theory so that it is actually useful for you.

Do you make these mistakes? Do you know other things that mistakes that are common?

6 Most Important Dominant Scales And Hidden Tricks With Them

Dominant Scales!

Using different Dominant scales on dom7th Chords is one way we can make variation and add new sounds to our solos. In this video I will go over the 6 basic scale choices you need to know for improvising over jazz standards and originals

For each of the scales I will go over what they are, the extensions or colors they add to the chord and also an example of a really useful but less common idea that you can use when soloing over the chord.

These ideas or arpeggios are things that I have dug out from improvising and studying the music you can make with these scales and they really give a clear picture of the sound plus they make for interesting melodies.

Content:

0:00 Intro

0:58 The Blues Scale Question?

1:15 #1 Mixolydian

1:48 Extensions

2:16 Constructing a great non-diatonic arpeggio

2:53 The Arepggio

3:03 Mixolydian chord voicings

3:20 Example of Lick / Analysis

3:55 #2 Dominant from Harmonic minor

4:29 Extensions

4:54 Constructing an arpeggio

5:21 b9b13 Chord Voicings

5:33 The Arpeggio

5:43 Mixolydian b9b13 Example / Analysis

6:34 #3 The Altered Scale

7:19 Extensions and Alterations in the scale

7:45 Altered Chord Voicings

8:06 The secret Altered Arpeggio

8:36 Altered Scale Example / Analysis

9:10 #4 Lydian Dominants

9:40 Extenstions and the 13th Arpeggio

9:58 Lydian Dom7th chord voicings

10:13 The Dom7th(#5) Arpeggio

10:45 Example Lydian Dominant

11:15 #5 Diminished Scale

11:46 Extensions and Alterations

12:21 Chord Voicings

12:34 The Overlooked Dom7th arpeggio

12:59 Diminished Dom7th Example / Analysis

13:26 #6 Whole-tone scale

14:06 The Extensions in the Whole-Tone scale

14:32 Chord Voicings

15:19 Whole-Tone Example / Analysis

15:55 Did I leave out a scale?

16:34 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

Guest Lesson: Odd-Meter Lesson with Gregory Bolomey – 7/4 Funk Groove

Playing in Odd Meters can be difficult but also a lot of fun. In this Guest Odd-Meter Lesson Gregory Bolomey from Axe of Creation demonstrates an E funk groove in 7/4. Playing grooves like this is essential to learning to feel odd-meters and certainly worth the practice time.

For me personally I also found that working on odd time-signatures has opened up my playing in 4/4 and 3/4 a lot.

If you like this video you should check out Gregorys channel:
Axe Of Creation – https://www.youtube.com/user/axeofcreation

10 Awesome Ideas for Better Jazz Licks You Should Know

It’s not all scales and arpeggios when it comes to guitar jazz licks. This video is showing 10 ways to come up with new licks using different ideas that are not all based on the notes. This can really open up your vocabulary and make your solos more interesting and I talk about methods working with dynamics, melodic direction and rhythm.

Some of the examples are also borrowing techniques from artists like Jim Hall, Bill Evans and Kurt Rosenwinkel.

Content:

0:00 Intro

0:49 Lick 1 – Shifting Patterns and Parts

1:43 Variation on Lick 1

2:05 Lick 2 – Melodic Direction and using the range of the instrument

3:06 Lick 3 – Accents, Dynamics and breathing life into your 8th note lines

4:13 Lick 4 – Extended arpeggios as a means to get a larger range

5:30 Lick 5 – Chromaticism and Bebop – Add the jazz flavour

6:36 Lick 6 – All the “other” arpeggios

8:13 Lick 7 – Across the bar line – Don’t be tied down by the bar lines!

9:19 Lick 8 – Space and Great Rhythms (Like Jim Hall)

11:04 Lick 9 – Blues in Funny Places (Courtsey of Joe Pass)

12:31 Lick 10 – Triplets and Modern Rhythmical Jazz Phrasing

14:20 Do you have a great idea? Share it in a comment!

14:43 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page

How to play a Melodic Solo? Thoughts and Exercises

How to play a melodic solo? In this video I try to figure what melodic might mean and then use that that to find a way to practice that and develop the skills needed to make a solo more melodic. There are some really useful exercises to work on for this with your improvisations and this video goes over two of those so you have a way to develop that skill in your playing.

What are your thoughts on Melodic Solo Playing?

I am really curious if you have another definition of melodic than what I use here? or if you have a great way to practice playing more melodic solos?

Content:

0:00 Intro – We know what melodic is, but how to practice it?

0:49 How to figure out what a melody and what melodic is?

1:19 Why Melodic is subjective and we have to live with that.

2:15 Turning it into exercises: What to focus on when improvising

2:59 Using Motifs – The most basic melodic building block

3:13 Beethoven

3:22 That French Song we keep playing

3:38 What do we need to practice?

3:58 Practice using motifs – Rubato

4:31 Example on Autumn Leaves

5:12 Practice in time

5:53 Autumn Leaves Motif solo example

6:14 Call-Response

6:31 Mozart does Call-Response

7:06 Practice Rubato – Call-Response

7:26 Example on Autumn Leaves

8:03 Solo on Autumn Leaves

8:35 Difference between a great and an ok solo?

9:31 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page and help me make more!

Modal Interchange – Chord Progressions with Beautiful IVm ideas

Modal Interchange is a great way to make your Chord Progressions more interesting and surprising. With Modal interchange chord progressions can borrow colors from the minor key that are surprising but still make sense to the ear and have a natural place in the harmony as you can see in the examples I reference from both Pop, Rock and Jazz like Radiohead and Deep Purple.

One especially interesting and beautiful version of this is using IVm or minor subdominant, which is the topic of this video. I will go over 5 types of minor subdominant or IVm chords and use examples from songs so you can hear how they sound and in that way get a better impression than just the theory.

 

Content of the video:

0:00 Intro

0:47 The basic IVm and that one important note

1:00 How a IVm chord works in a major key

1:37 #1 Basic IVm chord progressions as a transition and independent chord

2:14 IVm Example 1 – Radiohead

2:52 IVm Example 2 – Radiohead

3:09 IVm in Jazz, extensions and scales

4:28 #2 bVII – Backdoor dominant

5:55 bVII Example and Scale choice: There Will Never Be Another You

6:39 #3 IIø or IIm7b5 – How it works

7:25 IIø Example: I Love You

7:55 #4 bVImaj7

8:30 bVI Example in a cadence: Night and Day

9:07 bVI Example as an independent chord: Triste

9:43 #5 bIImaj7 – Neapolitan Subdominant

10:44 bII Example: You Stepped Out of A Dream

10:57 bII Example: Suspending the Tonic chord

11:40 bii Example: Deep Purple

12:29 Working with modal interchange and learning to use these chords

12:51 Do you have great clear examples of IVm chords? Leave a comment!

13:26 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

How to Play and Use Coltrane Patterns – Easy and Useful

Coltrane Patterns are amazing melodic patterns to have in your vocabulary. They are probably mostly connected to the Giant Steps solos on that Coltrane Album, but are actually very common melodies.

The fact that they are easy to play and map onto a major scale makes them ideal for adding to your vocabulary as useful and flexible melodic fragments.

This video will cover how you construct a major and a minor Coltrane Pattern. How you can make diatonic versions. Different ways of playing them using different techniques. I will also discuss how you can choose different Coltrane Patterns for chords.

Finally I also have two examples of how you use them for superimposing strong melodies on top of other chords like altered dominants.

Content:

0:00 Intro – Coltrane Patterns

0:35 Solo with Coltrane Patterns

0:45 The Giant Steps connection and why they are great

1:07 What is a Coltrane Pattern, Major and Minor versions

1:22 Major Variation

1:40 Minor Variation

2:18 Three ways to play the Coltrane Pattern in several octaves

2:41 2-2 version

2:44 3-1 version

3:02 1-2-1 version

3:32 Simple ways of making melodies with the notes

3:46 Combining this with a major scale – Diatonic to each step in the scale

5:05 Applying the Patterns to a II V I in G major

5:20 Which pattern for which chord

5:50 Example Lick with an Am7 using Em Coltrane Pattern

6:02 Example Lick with an Am Coltrane Pattern on a D7

6:43 How it isn’t really a “Coltrane” Pattern

7:06 Super-imposing Coltrane Patterns

7:32 Lydian Augmented example

8:00 Short solo example on a Cmaj7 Shell-voicing

8:13 Altered Dominant example

8:42 Ab7alt line with an E Coltrane Pattern

9:17 How do you use or practice Coltrane Patterns?

9:58 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

Maj7 Chords – 7 Great Solo ideas!

Maj7 Chords are one of the most important tonic chord types. This video will show you 7 different ideas that you can use when improvising over Maj7 chords. The concepts I cover are using different arpeggio types, triad pairs and super-imposed pentatonic scales both common and more exotic.

Content of the video

0:00 Intro – Maj7 Chords and ideas

1:18 Example 1 – Solo

1:40 Interesting versions of Cmaj7 and Em7 arpeggios

2:29 Using arpeggios and making them less boring

3:38 Example 2 – Solo

4:04 Pentatonic scale from the 3rd of the chord

4:34 Different sounds from different phrasings

5:05 Less Rock/Blues sounding ideas

5:58 Example 3 – Solo

6:23 Triad pairs: G & Am

6:54 Analyzed relative to the C root

7:27 Melodic approach from triad pairs and that specific sound

8:23 Example 4 – Quartal Arpeggios

8:48 The “new” sound of Quartal melodies in a solo

9:17 two ways to check them out over a chord

9:50 Some technical ideas for playing quartal arpeggios

10:53 Example 5 – Solo

11:16 Am6 pentatonic – Robben Ford on a Maj7 chord

11:50 Constructing an Am6 pentatonic scale

12:35 Simple ideas from this type of phrasing.

12:55 Example 6 – Solo

13:20 Am & Bm – Lydian Triad pair.

13:57 Phrasing using Spread Triads and inversions

14:43 Example of a line using the triad pairs

14:58 Example 7 – Solo

15:22 Emaj(b6) Pentatonic scale on a Cmaj7 chord

15:42 Where it comes from

16:15 How to construct and play the Emaj(b6) Penta scale.

17:07 Phrasing and making lines with the scale

17:40 Do you have other good suggestions you like to use? Leave a comment!

18:32 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

Jazz Chord Progression – Knowing the blocks that make up the Jazz songs

A Jazz Chord Progression is made up of smaller blocks of progressions. This video will go over the three most important types of blocks or progressions that you need to know in order to understand the chord progression of a jazz standard. These will help you memorize and play jazz songs and make it possible for you to get better at sight-reading jazz lead-sheets.

Content:

0:00 Intro – Thinking in blocks of chords – for memorizing and transposing

0:28 The three building blocks that cover most jazz standards

1:06 Block 1 – The Key and the basic cadence

2:10 The Turnaround – creating a loop

2:52 The Substitute for the Tonic: III VI II V

3:14 Block 2 – Secondary Cadences and dominants

3:42 List of Cadences

5:12 List of Secondary dominants

6:00 Block 3 – Subdominant chords in major

6:25 The Country version of a IVm chord

7:15 Common variations of IV IVm progressions in Jazz

8:40 Why think in blocks or groups of chords?

9:15 Did I miss a progression or a chord? Leave a comment.

10:07 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page