Tag Archives: guitar

Allan Holdsworth – This Is How He Uses Arpeggios In A Solo

This Allan Holdsworth lesson takes a look at his solo on The Things You See and especially some of the arpeggio based ideas he uses.

To me, Allan Holdsworths playing is not really based on the use of arpeggios. His lines are more scale based and uses interval structures that don’t always make sense as complete arpeggios. At the same time he does have some ways that he uses arpeggios in his playing that is hugely interesting and for me has been very useful to check out. Among other things his use of Quartal Arpeggio and the way he plays them in this video is very interesting.

Other Lessons on Allan Holdsworth

If you want to check out some of the other lesson I have done on Allan Holdsworth you can do so here:

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Triads on a G7 – The Most Important Solo Tool

When you start to play jazz it is easy to get completely lost in extensions, alterations and chord substitutions. And while that is also a part of jazz then it is often much more useful to work on more simple things like what Triads you can use on a dominant chord.

To demonstrate some of triads you can use in a Jazz Blues solo and also talk about different ways to use them I have written a one chorus solo on a Blues in G which will illustrate a lot of options in terms of triad options for a lot of the chords in there.

The G Jazz Blues Solo

As you can see in the video the first thing to check out is the solo. If you can then go through the solo now and mark down the different triads you see. Not all phrases are pased on triads, but most of them are.

The Basic triads on a G7(9,13)

The first bar is a phrase made with a root position G major triad, sliding up to the 3rd and then playing first the root and then the 5th that I repeat.

You want to check out how to use the G triad on a G7, especially for a G jazz blues, but make sure to also work on how to play different melodies with it by learning the triad notes in different order or checking out inversions.

If you want to hear somebody use triads well then listen to Charlie Parker or John Coltrane (not the smallest names in Jazz..)

An overview of the triads on a G7 can be made by looking at the G7 with all extensions, similar to stacking the scale in 3rds from G:

G B D F A C E – G7(9,11,13)

G B D – G major

B D F – Bdim

D F A – Dm

F A C – F major

E G B – Em

Am and C major have too much of a “C” sound to really work well on G7. If you want to check out some more ideas for triads then this article might be helpful: Triads – How To Make Jazz Licks and what to Practice

The line on the C7 is not based on a triad.

In Bar 3 the opening phrase is developed using a similar but extended version of the melody. Now the triad used is the one from the 3rd of the chord: B dim.

This is developed further moving up to a Dm triad in bar 4. From there the melody is with a Db triad. The triad of the tritone substitute: Db7.

The IVth degree and the #IV dim chord.

On the C7 the melody is constructed of the triad on the 5th: Gm and on the C#dim the triad is on C#dim. Of course all 4 dim triads could work: C#,E,G and Bb.

Returning to the G7 the melody is constructed from a descending F major. With the F major triad you need to be a little careful with the C so that it still sounds like a G7. In this case I am moving the melody to a B.

On the Bø E7 is played using the triad from the 3rd of Bø: Dm and the one on the b9: Fdim

The Final Cadence and two Triad Combinations

The Final II V: Am7 D7 is using combinations of triads. The Em and C triads on the Am7. In this case this is not a triad pair since a triad pair is made up of triads that have no common notes. If you want to explore triad pairs then this lesson might be useful: Traid Pairs Part 1

On the D7al the triads are Ab and Ebm. The Ebm is neatly resolving to the triad on the 13th of G7: Em.

The melody on the D7alt and G7 is repeated and developed on the D7 into a D augmented triad.

Give you Jazz Blues playing a Boost

If you want to get some new ideas for you blues soloing and check out how I phrase on a medium Bb Blues then check out this lesson based on a transcribed 4 chorus solo. Discussing arpeggios, blues phrasing and pentatonic scales.

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Mike Moreno – How To Think Ahead in a Solo

This Mike Moreno Guitar Solo has some really fantastic lines and demonstrates some great melodic ideas, especially in the last example. But when I was preparing the video and looking at the examples I realized that there is also something else going on. It is not only about the interesting arpeggio choices or beautiful long phrases. Mike Moreno is also clearly always thinking ahead when he is playing and doing some very interesting cross the barline things in this solo.

There are a few different videos of Mike playing this song on YT in different settings, and it is probably a favourite of his. Which I can’t blame him for it is a great song with some really interesting changes and that is also why it is wonderful to see such a great solo on the progression!

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If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for topics then please let me know. Leave a comment on the video or  send me an e-mail. That is the best way for me to improve my lessons and make them fit what you are searching for.

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Chord Melody – The 2 Positions You Need to Know

We don’t think too much in positions when it comes to Chords and Chord Melody Guitar. That is something that is connected more to scales, but it does make sense to have this perspective especially if you want to work on ways to improvise in a solo guitar setting where you want to use full chords with a root.

In The first video I did on this topic I was working on one position and exploring some options there. In this video I am going to look at the other one and show you how to improvise there on a II V I giving you a way to look at the chords so that you can take a voicing and add a melody on top of that.

The 1st Position from the Previous Lesson.

This lesson is continues from a previous video I made on the topic. You can check out here: Chord Melody Solo Process

The position I discuss in that lesson is the one use in that lesson is around this set of notes:

The best way to think of this “position” (since it isn’t really a position) is as a set of root notes.

The “other” Chord Melody Position

By starting with the root of the II chord on the 6th string you get this position. Showed here with Shell-voicings.

Examples and “Chord melody Solo Scales”

The way I am going to explain this is by looking at some examples and use those to make some scale positions of notes with one main chord voicing.

The first example could be something like this:

Finding scales for each chord

The notes that can be used for each of the chord are found in the C major scale. I am leaving out notes that don’t fit the chord or it’s function.

You can find another example with the same note-pool is shown here below:

Adding an altered dominant

A similar set of chords and notes but using an altered dominant would look like this:

An example of how this is used is shown here below.

Notice that sometimes the chord voicing changes to allow for the rest of the line to be more playable. This is how I am playing the line on the Dm7 chord.

Another example of how the altered dominant can be used is shown here below. The melody here is a motif stated on the II chord and then developed on the Valt chord.

Joe Pass Chord solo book

A book, that I have used and learned a lot from is this book of transcribed chord solos. I mention it in the video.

Joe Pass – Chord solos
 http://amzn.to/2kk2zei (affiliate link)

Chord Melody Survival Kit

If you want to develop your skills with chord melody then you can check out this lesson where I break down my basic process for making a chord melody and demonstrate how to turn this into an arrangement.

The lesson includes 3 arrangements and video lessons describing how they are made.

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Jazz Tone – How To Make A Strat Jazz Sound

How to get a good Jazz Tone and how I get my tone in the videos are two of the questions I get most frequently. I haven’t done too many videos on gear and tone, but I thought I might try to make one.

This video is quite long and discusses jazz tone or guitar tones in general as well how to get the best possible jazz sound out of a Fender Stratocaster. I am of course talking about Jazz Tone according to my taste, since this is a very very subjective topic.

In the video I cover the settings and pickup choices for the guitar, the settings I use on an amp (in my setup and also when I am using amps that are I get at a venue). I also go over a great secret trick that I like to use to get a better sound and fuller sound out of an amp. This works especially well with Fender tube ampls in my experience.

Content of the video

0:00 Intro

0:47 Jazz-Tone what is that?

1:18 Ideas about Jazz and Guitar Tone in General

1:41 The different topics covered in the video

2:16 A Quick Overview of what you hear in the video

2:43 My ’92 SRV strat

3:01 Pick Choices – The Sound of the different pickups

3:42 Why I prefer the Neck Pickup

4:17 Different combinations of Pick up and tone settings.

5:58 The most important part of the Guitar Tone

6:48 Picking Hand Position

8:14 Amp – Setup and AX8 – Signal Chain

10:25 Low FrequenciesThe Amp Bass Settings

11:27 Mid FrequenciesMid and Boost Settings

13:03 High FrequenciesTreble Settings

13:44 Fender Amps andtheir Mysterious EQ

15:23 Using Effects to geta Better Jazz Tone

15:40 Overdrive Pedal Trick

17:18 Overdrive Pedal #2

19:04 Compressor

20:39 EQ-Pedal

22:53 Like The Video? Check out My Patreon Page!

Merry Christmas – a look at some stuff from 2018 and what is coming up

Instead of laying a lot of heavy Nerd Arpeggio Magic on you here on Christmas Eve I decided to try to make a Video Christmas Card.

But beyond the christmas greetings I also talk a little about the year, how I think about making videos and of course what I plan to do.

If you have ideas for videos or suggestions on the stuff I already do then leave a comment!

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If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for topics then please let me know. Leave a comment on the video or  send me an e-mail. That is the best way for me to improve my lessons and make them fit what you are searching for.

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How to Practice Comping and Not Just Chords

Most of the time advice on Jazz Guitar Comping is about what chords to play and not how to play them. This one is about how to actually Practice Comping.

Comping is important, but since it is about playing behind somebody else it can be difficult to practice on your own. So how do you work on it? In this video I am going to show you a few ways to work on your comping and a list of things to think about when it comes to listening to your own comp.

Ways to Practice Jazz Guitar Comping

The old method: Metronome 2&4 play some comp think about how you want it to sound and imagine the band playing with you. 

This is the most important thing to practice and you want to be able to do this well, but there are other ways where you can try to work on it.

One of the ways that take advantage of some of the things we have available in this more modern tools like recording yourself and using backing tracks. I also discuss some of the things that you can learn and think about when doing this.

Content:

0:00 Intro – Getting the Wrong Answer

0:57 Different ways to practice comping and a check-list

1:13 Traditional VS Modern Methods of working.

1:41 #1 The Ancient Method of practicing

2:52 #2 Record yourself with a backing-track

3:09 Good resources and Good Drummers

3:30 Comping with drums – Learn to Listen

4:31 #3 Be Your Own Soloist

5:50 The Essential Checklist for Comping –

6:08 Over comping?

6:44 Conveying Groove and Harmony?

7:06 Is it in Style and fits the context?

8:23 Interacting with the Band

8:43 Interacting with the Soloist

9:14 Develop You Taste with Comping – Get Inspired!

10:00 My Favourites when it comes to comping

11:01 Like the video? Check out My Patreon Page!

George Benson – This is The Best Jazz Blues Solo I know

I have been planning to make this George Benson Guitar Lesson for a long time! When it comes to Bop phrasing and Jazz Blues then George Benson is really in the top 5 with most people. This guitar lesson takes a look at the George Benson solo on the Charlie Parker F Blues: Billie’s Bounce

I spend days figuring out this solo when I got into jazz. His playing and phrasing on this F blues is truely mind-blowing. This is by far one of the best jazz blues solos that I know and really a must if you want to stufy Jazz Guitar in a bebop or hardbop style.

You should also check out how great Herbie Hancock, Billy Cobham and Ron Carter play on this. Especially Hancocks solo is amazing and the trading with piano and guitar is also great and really illustrates how George Benson can also go outside and play more modern jazz licks.

George Benson skills to add to your tool-set

Some of the things that I will cover in this video is

  • How he mixes blues and bop phrases into one great language
  • His favourite Arpeggio
  • What makes his licks so great
  • How he is mostly using very very simple things in the solo (he is just very good at it)

And then I am also going to show you one way of thinking about chords, scales and arpeggios that he uses here that is not that common but he makes it into some really great lines, it’s something he uses a lot in this solo.

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Jazz Blues Comping – Drop2 Chords You Need To Know

This lesson is one chorus of simple jazz blues comping and then talk about a skeleton voicing + a few variations and some ideas for variations. I also discuss a few secret tricks that most people don’t think about with chords but that work really well to play more complicated phrases or embellish comping and chord solos

One of the most important types of voicings you want to have in your vocabulary if you want to play jazz, blues or R&B is the drop2 voicing. In this video I am going show you a simple way to apply Drop2 chords to a 12-bar Jazz Bues with just a few voicings and som variations that are easy to get into your playing.

Along the way I am also going to cover some some phrasing and rhythm ideas to really lay down the groove, and a few secret tricks that most people don’t think about with chords but that work really well to play more complicated phrases or embellish comping and chord solos

Drop2 chords are in many ways the go to voicing that you need when comping in a mainstream or hardbop jazz style.

If you want to look into more Drop2 Voicing ideas then you can also check that section of my Jazz Chord Study Guide

The big take away from this lesson

The most important thing to learn from this is that instead of learning a million separate voicings it makes a lot more sense to learn one voicing and realize that a lot of other voicings are variations of that basic voicing.

When you are comping you are not thinking about voice-leading or extensions as much as you are thinking about the melody that is in the top note of the voicing and the overall sound of voicing. 

The Jazz Blues Comping Chorus

Here below is the chorus that I play in the video. I suggest you check it out in the video.

A good way to use this lesson is to go through the voicings in the examples below and then return to this first example and recognize what is going on.

The Bb7 Drop2 voicing and it’s variations

Instead of having a focus on the inversions of the drop-2 voicing it is much more useful to think about how to create melodies. 

Here below is shown a very basic Bb7 chord and then followed by a few variations that are helping you have different options for creating melodies with this chord in this area of the neck.

The Eb7 voicing

This example here shows some of the common Eb7 chord variations in this position of the neck. Notice that there are not that many, but in the end you don’t really need a lot. If you try to play a complicated melody in your comp it will most likely be way to busy (and get you fired)

Bb7 altered dominant Drop2

The Bb7alt chord in bar 4 is there to pull towards the Eb7 in bar 5. Some options for that voicing is shown here below.

The final II V Cadence in bar 9 and 10

The cadence is a II V in Bb major, so Cm7 F7. I chose to use F7alt to have another altered dominant.

Secret trick #1 – Chromatic Passing Chords

When moving from one chord to the next then it can be useful to add a chromatic passing chord and then just sliding that into the next chord. This is surprisingly easy and creates a lot of movement in your comp (or chord solo…) 

This is one of the few things that is easier on guitar compared to piano.

I do this quite a few times in the chorus: Bar 1 with a slide and Bar 10 without a slide.

If you want to check out more ideas on chord soloing and using chromatic ideas then check out this lesson: Best exercise for jazz guitar chord solos! 

Secret trick #2 – Using Pull-offs in Comping

A great way to play faster phrases in a comping situation where you have a top-note melody that moves a lot (like an 8th note triplet) is to use legato. I especially like using pull-offs for this,

You can see examples of this in bars 5,9 and 12.

More Blues Comping

If you want to see further examples of comping and also expanding this beyond the drop2 voicings then check out this WebStore lesson:

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Charlie Parker This Is The 5 Way He Uses Arpeggios

Everybody can play a Cmaj7 arpeggio, but not everybody can do it like Charlie Parker.

Knowing and using arpeggios is a part of jazz, but there are a lot of ways to create great melodies with them. In this video I am going to go over 5 ways that Charlie Parker uses arpeggios in his solos. If there is one place you want to learn this then it is probably the father of Bebop.

An you do want to have some ideas that are not just running up and down the arpeggio or up the arpeggio down the scale which is exactly what this video can show you.

We often forget that a the difficult part is not what notes to play over a chord, it is how t play them. For me this is something that I have learned from transcribing and analyzing solos like I am doing in this video.

How to learn from Charlie Parker

This video is covering the 5 ways that Parker played arpeggios, taken from his solos and then I discuss how you can put that to use in your own playing with examples where I have made Jazz Licks using the same techniques with arpeggios.

Content of the video:

0:00 Intro

0:29 It’s about how you play the arpeggio not what notes are in it

1:05 #1 The Bebop Arpeggio

1:28 What is the Bebop Arpeggio and How To Practice it

2:32 How You can use The Bebop Arpeggio in your solos

3:06 #2 Honeysuckle Rose Arpeggio

4:11 Two Ways to use the Honeysuckle Rose Arpeggio

5:27 #3 Melodic Trail off

6:45 Using Melodic off in a II V I lick

7:27 #4 Voice-Leading Arpeggios

8:44 How To Use this principle in your own lines

9:27 #5 Rhythmic Displacement

9:50 How Charlie Parker sets up the Rhythmic idea

12:03 Explaining the Poly-rhythm

12:38 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

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